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MicroBit: Coding Made Simple

On Friday, Joe and I had the privilege of working with 5th grade students in Mattawan. We figured this was a great time to break out our micro:bit's to see what could be done with them in only 30 minutes. 

One of the main perks of the micro:bit is the simplicity and complexity that it can offer. Many of the 5th graders found that they could make an image appear on the LED screen with very little code. This often lead them to explore what they could do if they added more images. For some of them, it turned into animated versions of hearts scrolling across the screen. For others, it was their names or messages to other students.  Given that Joe and I gave very few directions, this was AMAZING!

A couple of the projects that were tackled by the students that astounded us were a coded game of rock, paper, scissors on the micro:bit and another code set that turned the micro:bit into a fully functional compass.  Now I must give a small caveat.  The students were using tutorials from makecode.microbit.org but they had to troubleshoot their errors when they made them and were actively engaged in the code writing process. 

I can't wait to see where this micro:bit journey continues to lead us!

- John

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